Planning Permission – do I need it?

planning Most new buildings or major changes to existing buildings or to the local environment need consent known as planning permission.

Without a planning system everyone could construct buildings or use land in any way they wanted, no matter what effect this would have on other people who live and work in their area.

A summary of the requirements are contained in the links below.
If you are in any doubt as to whether a particular project requires Planning Permission please contact us.

Single Storey Ext’
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Two Storey Ext’.
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Lofts And Dormers
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Outbuildings
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Conservatories

Single-storey extension

An extension or addition to your house is considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, provided certain limits and conditions are met.

1. On designated land cladding of any part of the exterior of a dwelling (and extensions) with stone, artificial stone, pebble dash, render, timber, plastic or tiles is not permitted development.
* Designated land includes national parks and the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage Sites.

2. Extensions (including previous extensions) and other buildings must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house. The term ëoriginal houseí means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date). Although you may not have built an extension to the house, a previous owner may have done so. * Sheds and other outbuildings must be included when calculating the above 50% limit.

3. Extensions forward of the principal elevation or side elevation of a house and fronting a highway are NOT permitted development.

4. On designated land side extensions are not permitted development.

5. Materials used in exterior work to be similar in appearance to those of the exterior of the existing house. This condition does not apply when the extension is a conservatory.

6. Width of side extension must not have a width greater than half the width of the original house.

7. Side extensions to be single storey with a maximum height of four metres.

8. If extension is within two metres of a boundary maximum eaves height should be no higher than three metres to be permitted development.

9. Single-storey rear extension must not extend beyond the rear of the original house by more than three metres if an attached house or by four metres if a detached house.

10. Single storey rear extension must not exceed a height of four metres.

11. Maximum eaves and ridge height of extension no higher than existing house.

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Two-storey rear extension (extensions of more than one storey)

1. On designated land extensions of more than one storey are not permitted development. * Designated land includes national parks and the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage Sites.

2. Extensions (including previous extensions) and other buildings must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house. The term ëoriginal houseí means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date). Although you may not have built an extension to the house, a previous owner may have done so. * Sheds and other outbuildings must be included when calculating the above 50% limit.

3. Maximum eaves and ridge height of extension no higher than existing house. If extension is within two metres of a boundary maximum eaves height should be no higher than three metres to be permitted development.

4. Extensions of more than one storey must not extend beyond the rear wall of original house by more than three metres or be within seven metres of any boundary opposite the rear wall of the house.

5. Roof pitch of extensions higher than one storey to match that of the existing house, as far as is practicable.

6. Materials used in exterior work to be similar in appearance to those of the exterior of the existing house.

7. Any upper-floor window in a wall or roof slope in a side elevation must be obscure-glazed and non-opening unless the parts which can be opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which it is installed.

8. No balconies or verandas are permitted development.

Crown Copyright©2011 Reproduced with permission

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Loft conversion (Roof extension)

A loft conversion for your house is considered to be permitted development, not requiring anapplication for planning permission, provided certain limits and conditions are met.

1. Loft conversions are NOT permitted development for houses on designated land*.

2. To be permitted development any additional roof space created must not exceed these volume allowances:

* 40 cubic metres for terraced houses.
* 50 cubic metres for detached and semi-detached houses.

Bear in mind that any previous roof spaceadditions must be included within this volume allowance. Although you may not have created additional space a previous owner may have done so.

3. An extension beyond the plane of the existing roof slope of the principal elevation that fronts a highway is NOT permitted development.

4. Materials to be similar in appearance to the existing house.

5. No part of the extension to be higher than the highest part of the existing roof.

6. Verandas, balconies or raised platforms are NOT permitted development.

7. Any side-facing windows must be obscureglazedand non-opening unless the parts which can be opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which it is installed.

8. Roof extensions, apart from hip togable ones, to be set back, as far as is practicable, at least 20cms from the eaves.

9. Work on a loft or a roof may affect bats.You need to consider protected species when planning work of this type. A survey may be needed, and if bats are using thebuilding, a licence may be required.

* Contact Natural England for more advice.

* Designated land includes national parks andthe Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage Sites.

Crown Copyright©2011 Reproduced with permission

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Outbuildings

Outbuildings are considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, provided all the conditions are met.

1. On designated land* outbuildings to the side of the house are not permitted development.

2. Outbuildings are not permitted development within the grounds of a listed building.

3. In national parks, the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and World Heritage Sites the total area to be covered by any outbuildings more than 20 metres from ANY WALL of the house must not exceed 10 square metres to be permitted development.

4. Outbuildings are not permitted development forward of the principal elevation of the original house. The term original house means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date).

5. Outbuildings and other additions must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house.Sheds and all other outbuildings and extensions to the original house must be included when calculating this 50% limit.
The term original house means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date).

6. To be permitted development, any new building must not itself be separate, self contained, living accommodation and must not have a microwave antenna.

7. Outbuildings must be single storey with a maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres and maximum overall height of 4 metres with a dual pitched roof, or 3 metres in any other case.

8. If the outbuilding is within 2 metres of the property boundary the whole building should not exceed 2.5 metres in height.

9. Balconies and verandas are not permitted development. Raised platforms such as decking are permitted development provided thay are no higher than 300mm.

10.Containers, such as those used for domestic heating purposes, must not exceed 3,500 litres capacity to be permitted development. The other permitted development conditions which apply to outbuildings listed above also apply to containers.

* Designated land includes national parks and the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage Sites.

Crown Copyright©2011 Reproduced with permission

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Conservatory (single-storey)

Adding a conservatory to a house is considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, provided these limits and conditions are met:

1. On designated land cladding of any part of the exterior of a dwelling (and extensions/ conservatories) with stone,artificial stone, pebble dash, render, timber, plastic or tiles is not permitted development.
* Designated land includes national parks and the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage Sites.

2. On designated land conservatories extending beyond any side wall of the original house are NOT permitted development.

3. Conservatories (including previous extensions) and other buildings must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house.

The term ëoriginal houseí means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date). Although you may not have built an extension to the house, a previous owner may have done so.
* Sheds and other outbuildings must be included when calculating the above 50% limit

4. Conservatories forward of the principal elevation or side elevation of the original house and fronting a highway are NOT permitted development.

5. Side conservatory must not have a width greater than half the width of the original house. The term ëoriginal houseí means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date). Although you may not have built an extension to the house, a previous owner may have done so.

6. Side conservatories to be single storey with a maximum height of four metres.

7. If conservatory (at side or rear) is within two metres of a boundary maximum eaves height should be no higher than three metres to be permitted development.

8. Single-storey rear conservatory must not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house by more than three metres if an attached house or by four metres if a detached house.

9. Single-storey rear conservatory must not exceed a height of four metres.

10. Maximum eaves height should be no higher than the eaves of the existing house. The highest part of the conservatory should be no higher than the roof ridge line of the existing house.

Crown Copyright©2011 Reproduced with permission

Single Storey Ext’
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Two Storey Ext’.
|
Lofts And Dormers
|
Outbuildings
|
Conservatories

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